Category

Rescue

Surprise baby!

By | Rescue | No Comments

You find the darndest things visiting Jericho Beach. This little guy was alone on a path, no family in sight. He wasn’t breathing and was cold as ice, but the two girls who found him heroically tried to warm him up and he eventually he started breathing at first intermittently and then regularly. <whew> They took him home to Burnaby and on the advice of Pet Food n’ More’s Julie, messaged us. We gave her some advice and volunteer Karen Chan is now kindly driving all the way to Richmond to pick up some rabbit milk and some of the rabbit hair Deanna’s been collecting to keep the baby warm and is taking it to them in Burnaby. The baby is seems okay so far, he’s now actively squirming, pooping and peeing. We know a fellow whose young bunnies turned out to be older than thought, the girl gave birth to four babies, so maybe that mom can foster this baby, we’re going to ask. This baby’s going to need some luck and good wishes!

Trooper Update

By | Rescue, Sick Bunny | No Comments

Trooper sailed through the operation with flying colours and he’s with foster mom Rae recovering. (We’re still waiting for photos). He’s in great hands, Rae is a nurse.
We can’t thank everybody enough for your donations and good wishes. We’ve raised enough for the operation and managed to pay off a big chunk of our vet bill, which means the next bunny coming through in an emergency won’t be nail biter.

RIP Lucky & Patience

By | Rescue, Sick Bunny | No Comments

Thanks so much to the Burrard Animal Hospital emergency staff for being so kind when we brought Lucky in last night. She was in heart failure and didn’t make it, but Jenna, Dr. Basi and the rest of the staff did their best. The clinic was very supportive of rescue. Lucky was a large New Zealand girl rescued from the UBC research lab along with her boyfriend Oak, who is now also mourning her loss. It hasn’t been a good 24 hours for New Zealands, we also lost Patience, a smaller white New Zealand, one of four abandoned rabbits found in Maple Ridge. She had been fighting a mysterious ailment and losing weight for the last couple of weeks. In spite of multiple tests and vet visits, she passed this morning. RIP Lucky and Patience.
https://burrardvet.com/

Trooper, broken leg bunny

By | Rescue, Sick Bunny | No Comments

Deanna took last night’s broken leg bunny (now named ‘Trooper’) to Apex today and the news isn’t good. He’s neutered so he’s probably a recent dump. His foot is broken with the bone sticking through the skin and his hip is badly dislocated. The choices are euthanasia or amputation. He’s eating and seems really happy to be out of that scary parking lot. He’s appreciative of pellets, salads and even his meds. We really need to raise some funds to treat this bunny.  Can people pitch in their extra-cup coffee money? Go without some other little luxury? Get a friend to donate? Stage a mini-bake sale at work? Anything? Whatever can be done to help out this bunny. Unfortunately we can’t cover this.
https://www.gofundme.com/nu59c7u4

McDonalds baby?

By | Rescue | No Comments

This little tiny baby was picked up off of a driveway at a busy McDonald’s drive thru over a week ago now but we didn’t have time to post about the poor little tyke until now. He was even tinier then!

Tigger Update 2

By | Rescue, Sick Bunny | No Comments

Hi all, Tigger (or Oscar) is through the surgery and awake, so far, so good. Thanks so much to Adam, Joseph and Diana at Little Paws, it took up their whole day off.
They opted to amputate, they didn’t have a plate small enough, pins aren’t an option and they were afraid the recovery time and chance of complications was too great. They manipulated his other leg/hip back into the socket and hopefully it will recover without being compromised, otherwise we’ll be looking for a wheelchair.
Right now we’re looking for some pretty intensive foster care, especially if he doesn’t start eating. He’ll need three different meds two and three times a day. The incision will need to be iced and he may need to be fed Critical Care.
It would also be helpful (and potentially necessary) to find someone who can give him shots.
His cage is going to require at first constant cleaning, we really need to make sure he stays dry and doesn’t pick up an infection. Once he starts getting back on his feet (after a lot of cage rest) he’ll need a surface with traction, he can’t be on hardwood or linoleum.
Some people have offered to foster and/or adopt, thanks so much, but as you can tell, we really need to make sure it’s the right fit.
Thanks also to everybody who donated, sent prayers and gave advice.

Tigger Update

By | Rescue | No Comments

Tigger, the broken leg bunny, is doing well with cage rest, he’s eating and moving around. The Little Paws Animal Clinic is closed tomorrow but the crew has volunteered to come in on their day off to do the surgery. They are beyond awesome.  Both Dr. Avitan and Dr. Martinez will be there along with Diana. The x-rays are being circulated and they’ll have lots of additional opinions. Bunny rescuer Oscar found Tigger on the side of the road not moving at 2 in the morning so it’s pretty apparent he was hit by a car. (This is a photo he took soon after). His other hip is also dislocated. He’s in good hands. Thanks to everybody who’s been helping out.

Bunny Emergency

By | Advocacy, Donate, Rescue, Sick Bunny | No Comments

We have a bunny emergency. Somebody found an abandoned rabbit with a broken leg, they couldn’t find anywhere to take the poor thing (the agencies supposedly mandated to do this apparently can’t or won’t), so they called us and we couldn’t say no. The rabbit is at the Little Paws Animal Clinic in Richmond (Steveston) and will be having surgery when we get everything in place. Dr. Avitan will be giving us an awesome deal but we still need to fundraise to cover the costs and we’ll need a special needs foster home for this rabbit.

Our YouCaring fundraising account has been deleted (!) as they transition to GoFundMe (which doesn’t take Paypal) so funds can go through Rabbitats’ email address (rabbitats@gmail.com) for both Paypal and e-transfers, or contact Little Paws to put a payment on our account (604-241-7387). The Donate button on our Facebook page links to our website (rabbitats.org) donate page which also takes credit cards.

Please donate if you can.  We’re already stretched to the max.

Las Vegas Ferals

By | Advocacy, Rescue | One Comment

Rabbitats has been trying to address the Vegas issue and help them out for awhile, but we didn’t have a lot of information and we’ve been time challenged with some of our own issues. Now I see there were some important things we could have advised on, so sorry we dropped that ball.
When the Rabbitats founder (Sorelle) worked on the UVic rescue (903 rescued and relocated) and the Richmond Auto Mall rescue (300+ rescued and relocated) we learned it was imperative to clear the areas in a grid so that ALL the rabbits in any given area were removed. Any rabbits wandering into that area were then easy to spot and catch before they started families. Picking up numbers of random rabbits did not work. I’m sure the rescuers are now realizing this, given how the poisoning issue spurred the successful removal of most of that dump site’s rabbits.
We also operated on the premise that it was the property’s responsibility to cover the costs they would have spent regardless to remove the rabbits. The same issue happened at UVic with the University trying to send a budget to a rescue who was unsuccessful at making a dent, and people only stepped forward to donate when there was a lethal cull.
We approached the landowners with proposals that quoted the costs of lethal removal by pest control companies and the costs of landscaping repairs. We asked for these budgets to be re-allocated to rescue and they complied. Fundraising made up the difference.
The other failings were based in the rescuers trying to rehome the rabbits as house bunnies. While we did rehome the recently dumped rabbits to pet homes, the rest were rounded up, sterilized and placed in secure, predator proof and escape proof colonies in rural locations. With this method we were able to house dozens to hundreds at once, the enclosures were cheap to build and our designs made for very low maintenance. The rabbits can be very cheap to feed considering they were well able to survive on the natural foods in their environment before. Grass, hay, tree branches, bushes, etc, provide very low cost feed.
It is very possible to control these rabbits when it’s done correctly. It’s just been a learning curve.
Once the existing colonies are rounded up and new arrivals controlled, the pet rabbit world needs to address how to close off the supply with the municipalities including rabbits in their animal control programs (the same as cats and dogs), strict rules and regulations about breeding, spays/neuters, pet shop sales, etcetera. This is really not the overwhelming problem it appears to be.
https://www.atlasobscura.com/…/feral-bunnies-are-taking-ove…